Turning the garden corner

Still hungry. (Don't these guys take a break after frost?) Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Still hungry. (Don’t these guys take a break after frost?) Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

That’s the way I think about September.

It used to be that we assumed there would be a frost sometime at the end of August. Nowadays, we seem to glide through August into September before frost hits.

Until last night, only the higher elevation locations had seen widespread frost. Now, most of us have turned the gardening corner–from growing to harvesting and clearing. Sure, garlic will be planted next month, but the big grow is over for the year.

Here are some pictures from gardens around the region–most taken before the widespread frost and freeze last night.

The first series of photos comes from Cassandra Corcoran who lives and gardens in Monkton, Vermont. Cassandra has been sending us garden photos all summer. Here’s a link to what her garden looked like way back in June.

All that remains of the blueberries. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

All that remains of the blueberries. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Butternut squash: still flowering and not ripe enough. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Butternut squash: still flowering and not ripe enough. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buckwheat cover crop. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Buckwheat cover crop. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Hazelberts are ready! Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Hazelberts are ready! Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

 

 

Kuri ready for hardening off. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Kuri ready for hardening off. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

All brussel, no sprout. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

All brussel, no sprout. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The huge zuc! (And a nice look at a corner of Cassandra's garden.) Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

The huge zuc! (And a nice look at a corner of Cassandra’s garden.) Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

I received this beautiful photo from Judy Courtney in Piercefield…a pond garden.

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Frogs hiding this morning. Photo: Judy Courtney

Martha Foley had a couple of flower photos to share with us:

Azalea still hiding out in the ferns, its summer home. Coming inside soon. Photo: Martha Foley

Azalea still hiding out in the ferns, its summer home. Coming inside soon. Photo: Martha Foley

Volunteer morning glories taking over the black-eyed Susans and sneezeweed. Photo: Martha Foley

Volunteer morning glories taking over the black-eyed Susans and sneezeweed. Photo: Martha Foley

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This one from Pat Glover in the village of Canton:

Photo: Pat Glover

Photo: Pat Glover

Two spectacular photographs taken by morning host Todd Moe…exquisite.

Norwood sunflower, yesterday. Photo: Todd Moe

Norwood sunflower, yesterday. Photo: Todd Moe

Cricket on the comfrey. Photo: Todd Moe

Cricket on the comfrey. Photo: Todd Moe

 

Maria Corso just sent this one along, “taken in one of our gardens carved out of the forests on Bonno Road in Pierrepont.”

Photo: Maria Corso

Photo: Maria Corso

 

 

 

Perhaps my favorite photo this round, comes from Peter Wilson in the Saranac Lake area. The caption says it all.

 

Our tarp crop is coming along fine. Some is bluing up nicely, while some is still quite green. We got some frost last night, but it should pull through. Photo: Peter Wilson

Our tarp crop is coming along fine. Some is bluing up nicely, while some is still quite green. We got some frost last night, but it should pull through. Photo: Peter Wilson

Keep the photos coming. I’m interested in the progression of garden spaces through an entire year: piles of debris, piles of squashes, dead bean vines, dried corn stalks. It’s all part of gardening, isn’t it? For that matter, what pokes through the snow in your vegetable or flower gardens? Here’s my email address for those photos: ellen@ncpr.org. And, now, enjoy the fruits of your labor.

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2 Responses to “Turning the garden corner”

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  1. Martha Foley says:

    Very nice, Peter! To what to attribute the early bluing of the one?

  2. Peter says:

    Hi Martha. I’m no expert at tarp raising, but I have been piping The Blue Note to that side of the garden for the past few weeks… that may have something to do with it. I’m moving the speakers over now that our first crop is ready to harvest.
    If anybody has good recipes for fresh PVC tarp, I’m open to ideas.