Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Motherhood, apple pie and the Red Cross

redcrossposter2

World War II poster, the mom and apple pie iconic image of the Red Cross. Photo: Library of Congress via Wikipedia.

Icons of American life. Except the Red Cross seems to fall off its pedestal on a pretty regular basis in recent years. The current CEO Gail McGovern was brought on board in 2008 to help clean up the organization’s post-Katrina public image and public trust problems that surfaced during that disaster. She may have taken the image buffing charge a bit too much to heart, or too literally. In research and a story released on the occasion of the second anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, some disturbing priorities funded by the Red Cross under McGovern’s leadership:

Red Cross officials at national headquarters in Washington, D.C. compounded the charity’s inability to provide relief by “diverting assets for public relations purposes,” as one internal report puts it. Distribution of relief supplies, the report said, was “politically driven.”

During Isaac, Red Cross supervisors ordered dozens of trucks usually deployed to deliver aid to be driven around nearly empty instead, “just to be seen,” one of the drivers, Jim Dunham, recalls.

And, this:

During Sandy, emergency vehicles were taken away from relief work and assigned to serve as backdrops for press conferences, angering disaster responders on the ground.

Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern speaks at a post-Sandy press conference on Staten Island with emergency response vehicles as backdrops. Relief workers were angered that the vehicles were diverted for public relations purposes. (Via ProPublica: Catherine Barde/American Red Cross via Flickr)

Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern speaks at a post-Sandy press conference on Staten Island with emergency response vehicles as backdrops. Relief workers were angered that the vehicles were diverted for public relations purposes. (Via ProPublica: Catherine Barde/American Red Cross via Flickr)

This story has received a lot of attention following the coverage on NPR and via ProPublica. You may have heard the NPR coverage on the news programs this week. I urge you to check the extensive article at ProPublica if you’re interested in this story.

Certainly the Red Cross has done important, life-saving work over the years. But Ms. McGovern’s attention to branding and heavy investment in PR to elevate the organization’s image has been counter-productive. Everyone knows the Red Cross does good stuff. The best way to advance its image is to continue to do that work, and more of it–by spending far less on PR and at least 80% on the job of helping people.

I have a couple of dogs in this race. Back in ’98, during the ice storm that left huge swaths of the north country and eastern Ontario and western Quebec without power for as much as three weeks, the compelling takeaway was how quickly local volunteer fire departments and churches organized to provide relief to their communities. What they needed more than anything else was rapid response from the Red Cross to bring needed supplies into the region. That isn’t quite what happened. The Red Cross was relatively slow to respond and then the supplies had to be distributed on Red Cross terms, rather than allowing already effective and locally knowledgeable volunteers to proceed with their own methods. The Red Cross left a lot of ill-will in the wake of their presence in the north country.

As far as I'm concerned, this is all the branding the Red Cross needs...if it's doing its job well. Photo: public domain

As far as I’m concerned, this is all the branding the Red Cross needs…if it’s doing its job well. Photo: public domain

More recently, both FEMA and the Red Cross failed to deliver critical relief to the poor coastal neighborhoods outside of NYC. My son, who lives in Manhattan, has traveled to Far Rockaway every Sunday for the past year to help rehab housing, build pocket parks, playgrounds and gardens for the families who received no help in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Elsewhere in the state, politicians showed up to hand out money and promises to rebuild, while middle class or wealthier residents figured out how to access assistance from FEMA, and the Red Cross was visibly present. In Far Rockaway, it’s been crumbs–and the most help has once again come from local churches and community groups that just rolled up their sleeves and pitched in. No politically influential photo ops in Far Rockaway.

Mom and apple pie continue to hang in there without needing brand repair because they make their branding point by being what they are–Mom loves you regardless of your flaws and apple pie is just darn good to eat. Instead of spending time and money telling you what the brand is, maybe the Red Cross could learn something from mom and apple pie by simply doing what we all think the Red Cross does with its money.

Another regional winner: chocolate

Dark, milk or white, there's god chocolate being made right here. Image: Ajout d'une transparence

Dark, milk or white, lots of chocolate is being produced all over the place. Image: Romainhk, Creative Commons

New York, Vermont, Quebec and Ontario all produce lots of maple syrup, an array of dairy products, big crops of apples and so on. NCPR has reported on micro-breweries, craft beer studies, wine producers and wine trails and experimental crops, like saffron. Cocoa beans don’t grow here but it turns out our region makes some pretty good chocolate too.

As reported by Laura Robin in the Ottawa Citizen:

Hummingbird Chocolate Maker, a three-year-old bean-to-bar chocolate company based in Almonte, has won a second set of honours in as many weeks.

The International Chocolate Awards 2014 announced Monday Hummingbird has won Bronze in the Plain Dark Single-Origin category in the intensely competitive Americas semi-finals for its Hispaniola bar, which is made with beans from the Dominican Republic.

Last week, Hummingbird won Silver in the Canada-wide competition in the “dark chocolate bars flavoured with an infusion or flavouring” category for its Fleur de Sel bar, which is also made with beans from the Dominican Republic.

Not knowing much about the International Chocolate Awards I went to their website. Wow, what an amazing number of categories! And how might one apply to be a judge? (Hmm, experts only. Too bad.)

Vermont’s Lake Champlain Chocolates (est. 1983) has its own bean-to-bar award winner in a new line under the Blue Bandana label: “winner of the 2014 Good Food Awards for its 70% Madagascar Dark Chocolate Bar and 70% Madagascar Wild Pepper Dark Chocolate Bar.” Here’s a company Q & A with Eric Lampman about that award and why he wanted to work on single-origin craft chocolate.

Truth be told, it’s hard to write about all this without wanting to do more investigative reporting and some quality control sampling. But it’s nice to see this level of diversity and success as people in our region broaden what we make and eat.

Where it starts: cocoa fruit with cocoa beans. Image by Mininus, Creative Commons

Where it starts: cocoa fruit with cocoa beans. Image by Mininus, Creative Commons

New this Fall: Limited Edition Everything

Every few weeks my father sends out a “family thread” email to my siblings and those unlucky enough to be wed into the Cornett family. Topics generally relate to current events in the world or things family related: someone has a birthday and it’s time to tell embarrassing stories about them or, in this case, the actual time of year. As you could imagine, these email threads can get ugly…

This weeks topic sparked tame conversation, but everyone was surprisingly quite passionate about it. The question was “What is your favorite part about Autumn?”

Best thing about fall? Perhaps not.

Best thing about Autumn? Perhaps not.

My family was quick to jump all over this idea. If you’re lost, here are some generic Fall pastimes:

  • Apple picking
  • Fall foliage
  • Sweater weather
  • All items pumpkin spice
  • And finally, an excuse to wear socks with your Birkenstocks

It seems to be the season for limited edition everything- we’re talking pumpkin spice lattes, “spookylicious” Pop Tarts, an array of limited edition Fall flavors from Keurig, etc. I even found this limited edition Febreze scent on eBay. If you fancy something, I almost guarantee you can find it in Apple, Pumpkin Spice, or Fall Breeze for the next month.

It all seems a bit excessive, but limited edition everything always catches the eye. If limited editions weren’t so limited, we would all cringe at the thought of another pumpkin spiced latte by Easter. Speaking of Easter, remember how boring Cadbury Mini Eggs became once they were available year round? They still manage to be a personal favorite.

Something I have to admit is I too love fall. For me, as I finish up my senior year at SUNY Oswego, it’s the final weeks before the bitter cold and apocalyptic snow commence. It’s also the time of year for the releases of new television series or new episodes of the previous year favorites.

What is your guilty Fall pleasure? I think we all can chime in on this one.

Thanks for a perfect evening

In the first Listening Post essay after a fundraiser I usually focus on thanking everybody for their support and talk a little about what that support means to us at NCPR and to the work we do. But Brian Mann has already done a great job of that at The In Box this morning, so I’ll take a different tack.

This morning would have been the last big push toward goal in an ordinary fundraiser, and I would normally be reduced to a state of exhausted babblement by now. My nearly fourteen years with NCPR had resigned me to reserving two weeks each year to doing nothing but fundraise. Don’t leave town; don’t stray far from a phone and an internet connection. Eat, sleep, pitch, write, strategize, and not much else.

But last night, instead, I was able to enjoy a perfect North Country experience. Leave work a little early, grab the passport, turn off the cell phone and head north for the border. Rt. 2 upriver along the St. Lawrence from Prescott is one of the great fall (or any season) drives anywhere. Picturesque towns built to last from native stone and brick, sweeping views of America across the river sporting the golden end of fall color, far over shallows thick with migrating waterfowl of a dozen species.

loreenatrioOur destination was Brockville, one of the best river towns anywhere. (You should visit by water some time.) After a fine dinner in good company, in a restaurant housed in a two-century-old stone inn down on the waterfront, we headed a mile west to the Brockville Arts Centre to hear an unforgettable performance by one of my all-time favorites–Loreena McKennitt–whose journeys I have followed for more than twenty years as she traces the music of the Celtic migrations across the world.

Unlike the stereotype of the soprano diva, McKennitt has a gift for collaboration, drawing together a remarkable and long-lasting family of musicians around her. Her normal tour band numbers nearly a dozen and she sells out big halls across North America and Europe. But last night was an “intimate evening” in a small hall with two of her longtime partners, the stellar cellist Caroline Lavelle, and guitarist Brian Hughes, complementing McKennitt’s harp and piano, and framing that powerful and stratospheric voice that could pierce the hardest heart. Given the multiple standing ovations and two encores, it appears she did.

So thanks for the great night out. It probably wasn’t what you were intending to do when you went early to the donation page this year, but in fact, you all have not only made it a lot easier for all of us at NCPR to do our work, you have made it a little easier for us to get a life, too. Thanks for changing the game.

Wealth, philanthropy and libraries

Black Watch Library, Ticonderoga, NY. Image by Mwanner, Wikipedia

Black Watch Library, Ticonderoga, NY. Image by Mwanner, Creative Commons

On a recent visit to my local library, in small-town North Gower, I noticed a missive on Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries.

Conversing with the staff, I learned October is Canadian Library Month. (Read collected stories on how libraries enrich lives here.) The info on Carnegie Libraries was a supplement to the larger event.

Regrettably, I stumbled on that celebration near its end. But there’s still time to take in a big book sale at the Cornwall Library this weekend. And libraries are here for us every month of the year.

The U.S. marks National Library Week in April. But both countries were blessed with libraries funded through the philanthropic vision of Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919). Indeed, one of my former library haunts was the main branch of the Hawaii Public Library system, another Carnegie Library. (A bust of Carnegie there is sometimes adorned with flower lei.)

The so-called robber barons of the gilded age are often held up as unhealthy examples of wealth run amok. (Bringing to mind the phrase: everything old is new again!) But – just as Bill and Melinda Gates have chosen to put significant wealth into social service – industrialist Andrew Carnegie decided one legacy of his vast wealth would be free public libraries, open to all classes and races. NPR’s Susan Stamberg had this take on Carnegie’s complex role in US history.

Andrew Carnegie, 1913.

Andrew Carnegie, 1913. Library of Congress image.

Carnegie was born poor in Scotland before climbing to the top as a king of rail and steel in the U.S.

After becoming one the wealthiest men of his time, by the end of Carnegie’s career his main goal was to give it away. Carnegie famoulsly said “The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced”. As detailed in material compiled by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg, Carnegie wrote:

“Man does not live by bread alone.” I have known millionaires starving for lack of the nutriment which alone can sustain all that is human in man, and I know workmen, and many so-called poor men, who revel in luxuries beyond the power of those millionaires to reach. It is the mind that makes the body rich. There is no class so pitiably wretched as that which possesses money and nothing else. Money can only be the useful drudge of things immeasurably higher than itself. Exalted beyond this, as it sometimes is, it remains Caliban still and still plays the beast. My aspirations take a higher flight. Mine be it to have contributed to the enlightenment and the joys of the mind, to the things of the spirit, to all that tends to bring into the lives of the toilers of Pittsburgh sweetness and light. I hold this the noblest possible use of wealth.

And why fund libraries? Again, Carnegie waxes eloquently:

“I chose free libraries as the best agencies for improving the masses of the people because they only help those who help themselves.”

“There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.”

Brockville Public Library

Brockville Public Library, part of that city’s architectural heritage.

Carnegie’s well-directed wealth funded 111 libraries in Ontario alone and 14 others across Canada. According to the Carnegie Corporation of New York, his philanthropy funded 2,509 libraries through out the English-speaking wold, including 1,679 in the U.S. Carnegie didn’t always pay the full tab, he didn’t believe in fostering dependence. But his grants were often crucial for individual communities to raise any additional funds themselves.

According to Wikipedia, it’s been a legacy with longevity too (despite a slight numerical discrepancy in the total number of U.S. libraries in question.):

In 1992, The New York Times reported that, according to a survey conducted by Dr. George Bobinksi, dean of the School of Information and Library Studies at the State University at Buffalo, 1,554 of the 1,681 original buildings in the United States still existed, with 911 still used as libraries. Two-hundred seventy six were unchanged, 286 had been expanded, and 175 had been remodeled. Two-hundred forty three had been demolished while others had been converted to other uses.[19]

While hundreds of the library buildings have become museums, community centers, office buildings, residences, or are otherwise used, more than half of those in the United States still serve their communities as libraries over a century after their construction,[20] many in middle- to low-income neighborhoods. For example, Carnegie libraries still form the nucleus of the New York Public Librarysystem in New York City, with 31 of the original 39 buildings still in operation.

Turning to all of New York State, this Wikipedia list says 106 public and 3 academic libraries were funded through Carnegie’s efforts. Four public libraries and one academic are listed for Vermont. Is there one near you? (Hint: try Theresa and Ticonderoga, for starters.)

Think what you will about vast wealth and how it is acquired. By many accounts, Carnegie was also a ruthless capitalist. But his vision for redirecting riches toward the service of humanity remains a remarkable, lasting legacy. Thank-you, sir.

Long may we take advantage of that awesome opportunity, free and open to all. 

Main branch of the Hawaii State Library, another Carnegie legacy. (built: 1911–1913; Architect Henry D. Whitfield) Image: Wikipedia

Main branch of the Hawaii State Library, another Carnegie legacy. (built: 1911–1913; Architect Henry D. Whitfield) Source: Wikipedia

Canada’s day after

2009 View of the War Memorial with Parliament Hill in the background. Photo: Lucy Martin

2009 View of the War Memorial with Parliament Hill in the background. Photo: Lucy Martin

And now what?

A fair number of regular people and top politicians across Canada are saying Wednesday’s attack in Ottawa could change everything. No more innocence, far less open access.

It is amazing how the actions of just a few can cause so much grief and upset. Distressing to think the balance of normalcy is so fragile.

There will be ample evaluation of what happened – what should have happened? – and what should come next. I don’t feel like raising criticism today, even though some are already identifying aspects of yesterday’s events that seemed lacking.

No, I want to thank those who responded, extend sympathy to those who suffered and fervently hope Canada can take a page from Great Britain’s response to World War II “Keep calm and carry on.

Living in Ottawa I have marveled at the city’s relative peace and low-key tenor. With little fuss and no serious barriers, I’ve been at the War Memorial, and the lawn at Parliament Hill many times. Sometimes within feet of Queen Elizabeth II, various Governor Generals, Prime Ministers, Mayor Jim Watson and other national and international dignitaries.

Parliament Hill welcomes innumerable school tours and visitors, all able to see those halls of democracy with relative ease. (And beautiful halls they are, with stone work I consider breathtaking.) The lawn fronting Parliament Hill has long been a safe happy place to gather – for events like Canada Day, restrained political protest, even “Yoga on the Hill“, mats and all.

It’s a beautiful expression of Canada’s most famous quality, that of being “nice.”

Canada and Canadians know how to be tough as well.

But may we never lose, never give up, the pleasant decency that distinguishes life in “…the true north strong and free.”

The more love you give, the more you get

Photo: MTSOfan via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photo: MTSOfan via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

That’s how it felt during this month’s historic un-fundraiser fundraiser at NCPR. You asked for fewer program interruptions during our fall campaign, we gave you that, and holy cow! you gave back over the top. As I write this note of gratitude to all of you, we have surpassed our goal of $325,000 by more than $11,000 and we are still counting.

Needless to say, all of us at NCPR have been analyzing what we did right, what we could do differently or better in future fundraisers. We welcome your ideas on this, too.

Here are my personal takeaways from this game changing approach to raising money for the station.

1. It’s not about the thank you gifts or prizes, it’s not about what time of day we ask, it’s not about which one of us does the asking. It’s about the work we do and how much you value that work. Pure and simple: you care about the programs and all of the digital content NCPR makes available. That, my friends, is totally cool.

2. You are proud of NCPR. You take pride in this station as much as the people who run the station day to day do. At a party recently, I heard a station contributor and long-time listener telling someone who had just moved to the region how the Adirondack North Country has the best public radio station bar none. Like a mother hearing a teacher or neighbor tell someone else how wonderful or smart or friendly her child is, I puffed up with pride to hear a listener boasting about NCPR. That, my friends, is about as gratifying as it gets.

3. It’s all about respect. Specifically, you respect the work we do so you’re willing to contribute some money to keep it going. But the big epiphany for me: I think our new use of short messages with the phone number and web address shows our respect for you. No matter how (relatively) well we ran our old style fundraisers, we tended to talk to you differently during fundraisers than we do the rest of the year. Cajoling, admonishing, even lecturing a bit. With the new approach the implied message is that we respect you enough to trust that a simple reminder with the necessary contact information is all you need to do your part as a member of the public radio community. That, my friends, opened the heavens for me and leaves me convinced that together we can make this all happen for years to come.

Photo: BK via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photo: BK via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thank you–for being there for NCPR in so many ways, for caring about the work we do, and for making it so easy to admire and respect the people we serve.

Drought, then and now

Indian Valley Reservoir, California USA - Planet Labs satellite image. The effects of California’s drought become quite apparent in this image of a reservoir in Lake County, which supplies water to nearby Yolo County. In a non-drought year the visible water covers roughly twice the area, and contains ten times the volume.

Indian Valley Reservoir, California USA – Planet Labs satellite image. The effects of California’s drought become quite apparent in this image of a reservoir in Lake County, which supplies water to nearby Yolo County. In a non-drought year the visible water covers roughly twice the area, and contains ten times the volume.

I am just back from a week in California, which is experiencing a brutal, historic drought.

As I flew there and back, the lakes, reservoirs and dams all looked like this photo: drained and still-dwindling.

Running out of water is a chilling prospect, as some well-users there are already experiencing.

Really, this is the stuff of nightmares. When you get right down to basics, water probably comes right after air as something we simply cannot live without – no ifs, ands or “should haves”.

And while California is the hapless poster child for water shortages, much of the west is hurting too.

Why is this happening? Experts weighing that question derive some conclusions from the “Dust Bowl” experienced in the 1930s. A new NASA study puts the historical record in perspective:

Using a tree-ring-based drought record from the years 1000 to 2005 and modern records, scientists from NASA and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory found the 1934 drought was 30 percent more severe than the runner-up drought (in 1580) and extended across 71.6 percent of western North America. For comparison, the average extent of the 2012 drought was 59.7 percent.

In the U.S., debate about things like global warming and this recent drought tends to argue about natural or human causes. This NASA study finds both were in play:

Two sets of conditions led to the severity and extent of the 1934 drought. First, a high-pressure system in winter sat over the west coast of the United States and turned away wet weather – a pattern similar to that which occurred in the winter of 2013-14. Second, the spring of 1934 saw dust storms, caused by poor land management practices, suppress rainfall.

“In combination then, these two different phenomena managed to bring almost the entire nation into a drought at that time,” said co-author Richard Seager, professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in New York. “The fact that it was the worst of the millennium was probably in part because of the human role.”

The high-pressure ridge that effectively blocks wet weather may be beyond human control. But there’s hope better land use practices to combat erosion will help this time around.

Dust clouds reflect sunlight and block solar energy from reaching the surface. That prevents evaporation that would otherwise help form rain clouds, meaning that the presence of the dust clouds themselves leads to less rain, Cook said.

“Previous work and this work offers some evidence that you need this dust feedback to explain the real anomalous nature of the Dust Bowl drought in 1934,” Cook said.

Still, it’s best to not rest on those laurels.

…agricultural producers need to pay attention to the changing climate and adapt accordingly, not forgetting the lessons of the past, said Seager. “The risk of severe mid-continental droughts is expected to go up over time, not down,” he said.

If we’re lucky, then, the weather ridge could shift to allow rain and snow pack back to the parched west. And while these explanations are helpful, there may be more to the story as well.

It’s just scary, damned scary, to see what too little water can mean.

Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas. Dust bowl surveying in Texas, April 1935. Image: NOAA George E. Marsh Album, theb1365, Historic C&GS Collection

Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas. Dust bowl surveying in Texas, April 1935. Image: NOAA George E. Marsh Album, theb1365, Historic C&GS Collection

Still growing in mid-October

 

Photographed on October 14 in Rossie, NY by John and Liz Scarlett.

Photographed on October 14 in Rossie, NY by John and Liz Scarlett.

I received a couple of photos from our Rossie friends, John and Liz Scarlett featuring irises and morning glories flourishing against a background of fall foliage. There was a time when we would most likely have seen the first snowfall and certainly several killing frosts by mid-October. It’s a changing climate.

A whole shed wall covered with morning glories. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

A whole shed wall covered with morning glories. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

Irises against fall foliage. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

Irises against fall foliage. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also heard from two regular contributors to the All In garden posts–Adirondacker George DeChant whose photos regularly grace this blog as well as our Photo of the Day; and Cassandra Corcoran of Monkton, VT who keeps in touch throughout the growing season with updates from her garden.

Outside the post office Long Lake. Photo: George DeChant

Outside the post office Long Lake. Photo: George DeChant

Over in Monkton, Cassandra planted some cannellini beans with 7.5 ounces of seed and harvested over a gallon of shelled dried beans from that investment.

The cannellini bean patch, from 7.5 ounces of seed. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton VT

The cannellini bean patch, from 7.5 ounces of seed. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton VT

 

The harvested vines. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran.

The harvested vines. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bucket of beans, prior to shelling. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Bucket of beans, prior to shelling. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Beans for the winter. Photo; Cassandra Corcoran

Beans for the winter. Photo; Cassandra Corcoran

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After several years of sharing garden photos with us, I thought you’d enjoy seeing a picture of Cassandra herself. I think of this photo as The Dancing Gardener.

Gardener Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton, VT

Gardener Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton, VT

Still happy to see your late harvest and garden-clearing photos. Send to ellen@ncpr.org and remember: we’ll be getting those seed catalogues in the mail before you know it!

NCPR Grand Prize is airfare anywhere on planet Earth, drawing open until noon

Waikiki from the air. Photo: Christopher Rose, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Waikiki from the air. Photo: Christopher Rose, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Breaking News Update Monday 9 am:

We are done! Three hours into our on-air fundraiser, we have passed our goal. Thank you everyone who made this historic achievement possible.

This drawing will remain open until noon, so we can include people who have gotten in touch via mail since Friday. I gotta say it. Wow.

Dale Hobson, NCPR

* * *

Across the country, public radio stations are watching NCPR–and you.  Because we’re trying to reach our fall fundraiser goal of $325,000 without interrupting programs.

This would be an historic change, and your response has been heroic so far, taking us almost all the way to that goal.

Heroic work deserves a heroic reward, so it time to unveil the big kahuna, the Grand Prize that will go to one of you. On Monday, whether we have met our goal or not by that time, the grand prize will go to one of those that did not hesitate when the call went out.

And the prize is:

Airfare Anywhere, $2500 worth. Use it for as many trips as you want, as many seats as you want. Go anywhere, on us.

If you already donated, Thank You! If you haven’t—please don’t wait:

Make your gift to NCPR now!

And don’t miss your chance to win our grand prize drawing for $2500 of airfare anywhere. It happens Monday, and anyone who gets in touch with NCPR is entered to win.

Dale