Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Wealth, philanthropy and libraries

Black Watch Library, Ticonderoga, NY. Image by Mwanner, Wikipedia

Black Watch Library, Ticonderoga, NY. Image by Mwanner, Creative Commons

On a recent visit to my local library, in small-town North Gower, I noticed a missive on Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries.

Conversing with the staff, I learned October is Canadian Library Month. (Read collected stories on how libraries enrich lives here.) The info on Carnegie Libraries was a supplement to the larger event.

Regrettably, I stumbled on that celebration near its end. But there’s still time to take in a big book sale at the Cornwall Library this weekend. And libraries are here for us every month of the year.

The U.S. marks National Library Week in April. But both countries were blessed with libraries funded through the philanthropic vision of Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919). Indeed, one of my former library haunts was the main branch of the Hawaii Public Library system, another Carnegie Library. (A bust of Carnegie there is sometimes adorned with flower lei.)

The so-called robber barons of the gilded age are often held up as unhealthy examples of wealth run amok. (Bringing to mind the phrase: everything old is new again!) But – just as Bill and Melinda Gates have chosen to put significant wealth into social service – industrialist Andrew Carnegie decided one legacy of his vast wealth would be free public libraries, open to all classes and races. NPR’s Susan Stamberg had this take on Carnegie’s complex role in US history.

Andrew Carnegie, 1913.

Andrew Carnegie, 1913. Library of Congress image.

Carnegie was born poor in Scotland before climbing to the top as a king of rail and steel in the U.S.

After becoming one the wealthiest men of his time, by the end of Carnegie’s career his main goal was to give it away. Carnegie famoulsly said “The man who dies thus rich, dies disgraced”. As detailed in material compiled by the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg, Carnegie wrote:

“Man does not live by bread alone.” I have known millionaires starving for lack of the nutriment which alone can sustain all that is human in man, and I know workmen, and many so-called poor men, who revel in luxuries beyond the power of those millionaires to reach. It is the mind that makes the body rich. There is no class so pitiably wretched as that which possesses money and nothing else. Money can only be the useful drudge of things immeasurably higher than itself. Exalted beyond this, as it sometimes is, it remains Caliban still and still plays the beast. My aspirations take a higher flight. Mine be it to have contributed to the enlightenment and the joys of the mind, to the things of the spirit, to all that tends to bring into the lives of the toilers of Pittsburgh sweetness and light. I hold this the noblest possible use of wealth.

And why fund libraries? Again, Carnegie waxes eloquently:

“I chose free libraries as the best agencies for improving the masses of the people because they only help those who help themselves.”

“There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library, this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.”

Brockville Public Library

Brockville Public Library, part of that city;s ach

Carnegie’s well-directed wealth funded 111 libraries in Ontario alone and 14 others across Canada. According to the Carnegie Corporation of New York, his philanthropy funded 2,509 libraries through out the English-speaking wold, including 1,679 in the U.S. Carnegie didn’t always pay the full tab, he didn’t believe in fostering dependence. But his grants were often crucial for individual communities to raise any additional funds themselves.

According to Wikipedia, it’s been a legacy with longevity too (despite a slight numerical discrepancy in the total number of U.S. libraries in question.):

In 1992, The New York Times reported that, according to a survey conducted by Dr. George Bobinksi, dean of the School of Information and Library Studies at the State University at Buffalo, 1,554 of the 1,681 original buildings in the United States still existed, with 911 still used as libraries. Two-hundred seventy six were unchanged, 286 had been expanded, and 175 had been remodeled. Two-hundred forty three had been demolished while others had been converted to other uses.[19]

While hundreds of the library buildings have become museums, community centers, office buildings, residences, or are otherwise used, more than half of those in the United States still serve their communities as libraries over a century after their construction,[20] many in middle- to low-income neighborhoods. For example, Carnegie libraries still form the nucleus of the New York Public Librarysystem in New York City, with 31 of the original 39 buildings still in operation.

Turning to all of New York State, this Wikipedia list says 106 public and 3 academic libraries were funded through Carnegie’s efforts. Four public libraries and one academic are listed for Vermont. Is there one near you? (Hint: try Theresa and Ticonderoga, for starters.)

Think what you will about vast wealth and how it is acquired. By many accounts, Carnegie was also a ruthless capitalist. But his vision for redirecting riches toward the service of humanity remains a remarkable, lasting legacy. Thank-you, sir.

Long may we take advantage of that awesome opportunity, free and open to all. 

Main branch of the Hawaii State Library, another Carnegie legacy. (built: 1911–1913; Architect Henry D. Whitfield) Image: Wikipedia

Main branch of the Hawaii State Library, another Carnegie legacy. (built: 1911–1913; Architect Henry D. Whitfield) Source: Wikipedia

Canada’s day after

2009 View of the War Memorial with Parliament Hill in the background. Photo: Lucy Martin

2009 View of the War Memorial with Parliament Hill in the background. Photo: Lucy Martin

And now what?

A fair number of regular people and top politicians across Canada are saying Wednesday’s attack in Ottawa could change everything. No more innocence, far less open access.

It is amazing how the actions of just a few can cause so much grief and upset. Distressing to think the balance of normalcy is so fragile.

There will be ample evaluation of what happened – what should have happened? – and what should come next. I don’t feel like raising criticism today, even though some are already identifying aspects of yesterday’s events that seemed lacking.

No, I want to thank those who responded, extend sympathy to those who suffered and fervently hope Canada can take a page from Great Britain’s response to World War II “Keep calm and carry on.

Living in Ottawa I have marveled at the city’s relative peace and low-key tenor. With little fuss and no serious barriers, I’ve been at the War Memorial, and the lawn at Parliament Hill many times. Sometimes within feet of Queen Elizabeth II, various Governor Generals, Prime Ministers, Mayor Jim Watson and other national and international dignitaries.

Parliament Hill welcomes innumerable school tours and visitors, all able to see those halls of democracy with relative ease. (And beautiful halls they are, with stone work I consider breathtaking.) The lawn fronting Parliament Hill has long been a safe happy place to gather – for events like Canada Day, restrained political protest, even “Yoga on the Hill“, mats and all.

It’s a beautiful expression of Canada’s most famous quality, that of being “nice.”

Canada and Canadians know how to be tough as well.

But may we never lose, never give up, the pleasant decency that distinguishes life in “…the true north strong and free.”

The more love you give, the more you get

Photo: MTSOfan via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photo: MTSOfan via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

That’s how it felt during this month’s historic un-fundraiser fundraiser at NCPR. You asked for fewer program interruptions during our fall campaign, we gave you that, and holy cow! you gave back over the top. As I write this note of gratitude to all of you, we have surpassed our goal of $325,000 by more than $11,000 and we are still counting.

Needless to say, all of us at NCPR have been analyzing what we did right, what we could do differently or better in future fundraisers. We welcome your ideas on this, too.

Here are my personal takeaways from this game changing approach to raising money for the station.

1. It’s not about the thank you gifts or prizes, it’s not about what time of day we ask, it’s not about which one of us does the asking. It’s about the work we do and how much you value that work. Pure and simple: you care about the programs and all of the digital content NCPR makes available. That, my friends, is totally cool.

2. You are proud of NCPR. You take pride in this station as much as the people who run the station day to day do. At a party recently, I heard a station contributor and long-time listener telling someone who had just moved to the region how the Adirondack North Country has the best public radio station bar none. Like a mother hearing a teacher or neighbor tell someone else how wonderful or smart or friendly her child is, I puffed up with pride to hear a listener boasting about NCPR. That, my friends, is about as gratifying as it gets.

3. It’s all about respect. Specifically, you respect the work we do so you’re willing to contribute some money to keep it going. But the big epiphany for me: I think our new use of short messages with the phone number and web address shows our respect for you. No matter how (relatively) well we ran our old style fundraisers, we tended to talk to you differently during fundraisers than we do the rest of the year. Cajoling, admonishing, even lecturing a bit. With the new approach the implied message is that we respect you enough to trust that a simple reminder with the necessary contact information is all you need to do your part as a member of the public radio community. That, my friends, opened the heavens for me and leaves me convinced that together we can make this all happen for years to come.

Photo: BK via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Photo: BK via Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thank you–for being there for NCPR in so many ways, for caring about the work we do, and for making it so easy to admire and respect the people we serve.

Drought, then and now

Indian Valley Reservoir, California USA - Planet Labs satellite image. The effects of California’s drought become quite apparent in this image of a reservoir in Lake County, which supplies water to nearby Yolo County. In a non-drought year the visible water covers roughly twice the area, and contains ten times the volume.

Indian Valley Reservoir, California USA – Planet Labs satellite image. The effects of California’s drought become quite apparent in this image of a reservoir in Lake County, which supplies water to nearby Yolo County. In a non-drought year the visible water covers roughly twice the area, and contains ten times the volume.

I am just back from a week in California, which is experiencing a brutal, historic drought.

As I flew there and back, the lakes, reservoirs and dams all looked like this photo: drained and still-dwindling.

Running out of water is a chilling prospect, as some well-users there are already experiencing.

Really, this is the stuff of nightmares. When you get right down to basics, water probably comes right after air as something we simply cannot live without – no ifs, ands or “should haves”.

And while California is the hapless poster child for water shortages, much of the west is hurting too.

Why is this happening? Experts weighing that question derive some conclusions from the “Dust Bowl” experienced in the 1930s. A new NASA study puts the historical record in perspective:

Using a tree-ring-based drought record from the years 1000 to 2005 and modern records, scientists from NASA and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory found the 1934 drought was 30 percent more severe than the runner-up drought (in 1580) and extended across 71.6 percent of western North America. For comparison, the average extent of the 2012 drought was 59.7 percent.

In the U.S., debate about things like global warming and this recent drought tends to argue about natural or human causes. This NASA study finds both were in play:

Two sets of conditions led to the severity and extent of the 1934 drought. First, a high-pressure system in winter sat over the west coast of the United States and turned away wet weather – a pattern similar to that which occurred in the winter of 2013-14. Second, the spring of 1934 saw dust storms, caused by poor land management practices, suppress rainfall.

“In combination then, these two different phenomena managed to bring almost the entire nation into a drought at that time,” said co-author Richard Seager, professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in New York. “The fact that it was the worst of the millennium was probably in part because of the human role.”

The high-pressure ridge that effectively blocks wet weather may be beyond human control. But there’s hope better land use practices to combat erosion will help this time around.

Dust clouds reflect sunlight and block solar energy from reaching the surface. That prevents evaporation that would otherwise help form rain clouds, meaning that the presence of the dust clouds themselves leads to less rain, Cook said.

“Previous work and this work offers some evidence that you need this dust feedback to explain the real anomalous nature of the Dust Bowl drought in 1934,” Cook said.

Still, it’s best to not rest on those laurels.

…agricultural producers need to pay attention to the changing climate and adapt accordingly, not forgetting the lessons of the past, said Seager. “The risk of severe mid-continental droughts is expected to go up over time, not down,” he said.

If we’re lucky, then, the weather ridge could shift to allow rain and snow pack back to the parched west. And while these explanations are helpful, there may be more to the story as well.

It’s just scary, damned scary, to see what too little water can mean.

Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas. Dust bowl surveying in Texas, April 1935. Image: NOAA George E. Marsh Album, theb1365, Historic C&GS Collection

Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas. Dust bowl surveying in Texas, April 1935. Image: NOAA George E. Marsh Album, theb1365, Historic C&GS Collection

Still growing in mid-October

 

Photographed on October 14 in Rossie, NY by John and Liz Scarlett.

Photographed on October 14 in Rossie, NY by John and Liz Scarlett.

I received a couple of photos from our Rossie friends, John and Liz Scarlett featuring irises and morning glories flourishing against a background of fall foliage. There was a time when we would most likely have seen the first snowfall and certainly several killing frosts by mid-October. It’s a changing climate.

A whole shed wall covered with morning glories. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

A whole shed wall covered with morning glories. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

Irises against fall foliage. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

Irises against fall foliage. Photo: Liz and John Scarlett, Rossie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also heard from two regular contributors to the All In garden posts–Adirondacker George DeChant whose photos regularly grace this blog as well as our Photo of the Day; and Cassandra Corcoran of Monkton, VT who keeps in touch throughout the growing season with updates from her garden.

Outside the post office Long Lake. Photo: George DeChant

Outside the post office Long Lake. Photo: George DeChant

Over in Monkton, Cassandra planted some cannellini beans with 7.5 ounces of seed and harvested over a gallon of shelled dried beans from that investment.

The cannellini bean patch, from 7.5 ounces of seed. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton VT

The cannellini bean patch, from 7.5 ounces of seed. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton VT

 

The harvested vines. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran.

The harvested vines. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bucket of beans, prior to shelling. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Bucket of beans, prior to shelling. Photo: Cassandra Corcoran

Beans for the winter. Photo; Cassandra Corcoran

Beans for the winter. Photo; Cassandra Corcoran

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After several years of sharing garden photos with us, I thought you’d enjoy seeing a picture of Cassandra herself. I think of this photo as The Dancing Gardener.

Gardener Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton, VT

Gardener Cassandra Corcoran, Monkton, VT

Still happy to see your late harvest and garden-clearing photos. Send to ellen@ncpr.org and remember: we’ll be getting those seed catalogues in the mail before you know it!

NCPR Grand Prize is airfare anywhere on planet Earth, drawing open until noon

Waikiki from the air. Photo: Christopher Rose, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Waikiki from the air. Photo: Christopher Rose, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Breaking News Update Monday 9 am:

We are done! Three hours into our on-air fundraiser, we have passed our goal. Thank you everyone who made this historic achievement possible.

This drawing will remain open until noon, so we can include people who have gotten in touch via mail since Friday. I gotta say it. Wow.

Dale Hobson, NCPR

* * *

Across the country, public radio stations are watching NCPR–and you.  Because we’re trying to reach our fall fundraiser goal of $325,000 without interrupting programs.

This would be an historic change, and your response has been heroic so far, taking us almost all the way to that goal.

Heroic work deserves a heroic reward, so it time to unveil the big kahuna, the Grand Prize that will go to one of you. On Monday, whether we have met our goal or not by that time, the grand prize will go to one of those that did not hesitate when the call went out.

And the prize is:

Airfare Anywhere, $2500 worth. Use it for as many trips as you want, as many seats as you want. Go anywhere, on us.

If you already donated, Thank You! If you haven’t—please don’t wait:

Make your gift to NCPR now!

And don’t miss your chance to win our grand prize drawing for $2500 of airfare anywhere. It happens Monday, and anyone who gets in touch with NCPR is entered to win.

Dale

Give a little, make a little history, maybe win an iPad at 7 pm

Together we’re making history

Drawing tonight at 7 pm for the winner of an iPad AIr 2. Get your name in the hat.

Drawing tonight at 7 pm for the winner of an iPad AIr 2. Get your name in the hat.

Across the country, public radio stations are watching NCPR–and you. Why? We’re making history together! We’re trying to reach our fall fundraiser goal of $325,000 without interrupting programs.

It’s kind of a crazy story. We started this experiment wondering if we might be able to trim a day or so from the traditional six-day drive. Your response has been incredible and the momentum keeps building. We’re actually thinking we can reach our goal this week if everyone chips in. That would be extraordinary–a total game changer. It would mean that, for the first time, we wouldn’t have a traditional fundraiser that interrupts programs.

If you already donated, Thank You! If you haven’t—please don’t wait. If NCPR is important to you it’s time to give:

Make your gift to NCPR now!

And don’t miss your chance to win our next big prize drawing for an iPad Air 2. It happens today at 7 pm.

Thanks!
June

PS: If we don’t make it over the goal line by next Monday, no shame. But we will have to release the flying mon… I mean… start interrupting programs to ask for your support.

Sporting proposition: pro coaches are totally overrated

Mid October is great for pro sports, the NBA season tips off this year on the 28th, the NFL season is more than a quarter into the season, the MLB playoffs are moving fast towards the World Series and the NHL has started skating. If you are a professional sports fan in America (Canada, too!) then you like October.

This post however, is not to celebrate the leagues or teams, but to make a point that I have been making for quite some time with friends and family: pro coaches are totally and utterly overrated.

For the purpose of discussion, I will limit myself to what I know – NBA, NFL, MLB – I am not a very knowledgeable hockey guy. The parameters also defined are full seasons including post-season, etc.–exhibitions don’t count.

Head coach Eric Spoelstra, meh?. Photo: Lpdrew, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Head coach Eric Spoelstra, meh?. Photo: Lpdrew, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The easiest place I can make my case is when it comes to the NBA, and I’ve got plenty to work with – starting with Eric Spoelstra of the Miami Heat. Spoelstra had two seasons under his belt with perennial All-Star Dwayne Wade and had a respectable .548 winning percentage although with two first round playoff losses.

Enter LeBron James (and All-Star forward, Chris Bosh). In LeBron’s four years in Miami the Heat–“led” by Spoelstra–made four straight NBA finals, winning two. I wouldn’t call this a coincidence, and I’m excited to see what happens this season since LeBron skipped town and now that Wade is 33 (on the downward slope for NBA players) and has been battling serious knee issues now for several years.

The Heat still do have Bosh and have acquired some talent in the off-season, and they do play in a terrible Eastern conference, but I would be surprised if they did much better than Spoelstra’s previous .548 winning percentage. Certainly they won’t come close to the .717 win percentage that they had with LeBron.

Keeping with LeBron, what about his longest tenured coach with his first go around in Cleveland Cavaliers, Mike Brown? Brown had a .663 winning percentage in five years with LeBron and made it to one NBA final.

Unfortunately for the Cavaliers and Brown, the general manager and owner didn’t surround LeBron with much talent to speak of, which led him to bolt to the Heat. LeBron left for Miami and Brown got canned in Cleveland and took a job with the L.A. Lakers. Moving from Cleveland to L.A. sounds great! In Brown’s first year in L.A., all-time NBA legend Kobe Bryant and a loaded roster led the Lakers to win their division, but couldn’t advance past the 2nd round of the playoffs. In Brown’s second year there, he was fired after 5 games.

Brown got another shot back in Cleveland. Things are always better the second time around, right? Nope, Brown and lightly talented (but young and promising!) went 33-49, in a bad conference–and that ain’t good!

Another great example of contemporary NBA coaches is Mike D’Antoni, and this one especially hurts because he got my hopes up as a Knicks fan! In five years with the Phoenix Suns, D’Antoni had a winning percentage of .650 and even won NBA Coach of the Year once. Oh, FANCY! Come on over to New York we said, with open arms! Then, the Knicks went on to lose 167 out of their 288 games (fired mid-year in his fourth season) with D’Antoni for a winning percentage of .420. Gross.

But don’t worry, Mike got another shot too, he went to L.A. also, because one man’s trash is another–oh wait, he had a winning percentage of .435 there–I guess it wasn’t Brown’s fault after all!

So what made Mike so good in Phoenix? Well that would be a healthy Amar’e Stoudemire – a power house of a player and All-Star and multiple winning league MVP, Steve Nash. True, Stoudemire went with D’Antoni to New York, but by that point he was (and still is) pretty washed up.

Ok, let us move on from the NBA, even though it’s the game where one player can really dominate and make all the difference.

How about football? My favorite example to point to is Bill Belichick, coach of the New England Patriots, “The Hoodie,” the “Mastermind,” the blah, blah, blah – really the luckiest man in football. Belichick has led to the Patriots to three Super Bowls and appeared in two others.

To show why Belichick isn’t good, let’s take it back a few years. Before a stint as an assistant coach with the Jets, before becoming the head coach in New England, Belichick was the head coach with the Cleveland Browns (man, I am all over Cleveland, sorry, I actually liked the city the one time I was there when I was young). While with the Browns, Belichick had one really great year in five years there with a record of 11-5, but in the other four years, he was a combined 25-39, not exactly a “Mastermind.” One year of success in a span of five is not an indicator of talent or success, but rather an aberration.

So back to current times, in New England and why I say Billy boy is lucky – in his second year with the Patriots, Bill started the season 0-2 (after going 5-11 his first year there) and then they proceed to win 11 of the next 14, And what was the difference? Tom freakin’ Brady. (Disclaimer: I am a very, very bitter lifelong New York Jets fan).

Belichick only put his backup, Brady, in due to a late hit (a penalty) by the New York Jets linebacker, when Mo Lewis knocked out starting Patriots QB Drew Bledsoe. The Patriots drafted Brady in the sixth round–sixth! How could every team miss that talent five times over. Even the Patriots passed on him for five rounds, which indicates that they themselves had no idea how good he was, or else they wouldn’t have waited so long to draft him!

LUCK, I say, luck. Belichick’s time in Cleveland, followed by his acquisition and forced play of arguably the greatest quarterback ever has secured his spot as luckiest man in football.

Ok, how about baseball? As a (nearly) lifelong Yankees fan, this one kind of pains me, but let’s bring up Joe Torre. Torre took the Yankees to six World Series appearances and won four, but let’s examine the rest of his career.

Besides managing the Yankees, Torre spent time managing the New York Mets, Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals and L.A. Dodgers and at all those places had a combined winning percentage of .491, winning 1,153 games and losing 1,230–not very good.

Now, all of this being said, some coaches I think can really make a difference when it comes to certain things. For example, some coaches actually change the way the game is played. Bill Walsh of the San Francisco 49ers in the 198’s introduced the West Coast offense – short, quick passes–although he did have Joe Montana and Jerry Rice, possibly the two best ever at their positions.

How about Phil Jackson who put together the Triangle Offense, oh wait, he has this guy named Michael Jordan and another of the NBA’s 50 greatest of all-time players, Scottie Pippen. Well after Jordan and Pippen, Phil used the triangle in L.A. where all he had was Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neil who both are also possibly the best ever at their positions.

Hmmm. Maybe even the revolutionary coaches don’t mean much. Your thoughts?

 

Statistics from basketball-reference.com, pro-football-reference.com and baseball-reference.com

I get it. You don’t have to beat me over the head

Let’s see. I’ve gotten the letter in the post. And I get a message every couple of days in my email. And I can’t listen to the radio for more than half an hour without hearing about it. And if I go to the website a big orange bar slides out to tell me about. And there are messages in my Facebook feed, and even tweets, for God’s sake. #whatsahashtag? Everybody knows it’s time to do the thing.

And people are doing the thing–giving to NCPR’s Fall Fundraiser–because you do get it.  You give, public radio lives on. You don’t give, maybe somebody else takes over the frequency and plays classic psychedelic rock 24/7. That’s right–15-minute drum solos with your morning coffee. Nobody wants that. Well–my friend Frodo Half Moon might–but then he doesn’t get out much anymore.

nonotthat_300

Or we could try negative reinforcement….

Say you’re not an it-getter, or maybe you’re a lollygagger, what’s in it for you? How about half a grand? We’re drawing at noon today for a $500 Visa Gift Card. If you’re not in, you can’t win. That would buy a lot of brown rice and day-glo paint Frodo my friend.

We are now way past halfway to our goal of $325,000, thanks to all of you who respond to gentler forms of incentive. And we still have nine days left to reach our goal before we have to release the flying mon… I mean start interrupting programs to ask for your support. We can do this. Wouldn’t it be great to put the full-bore, in-your-face, long-form, beat you over the head with the toll-free number kind of fundraiser into the history books, along with mood rings, pet rocks, eight-track tapes and streaking? Ah, the crazy stuff we used to do.

Now we just do the thing.

Reasons to give: because monkeys are expensive

18monkeysPublic radio runs on a pretty lean budget. We try not to ask for more than we need. Sometimes there are creative things we can do to replace the need for additional funding. And sometimes, as Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me! host Peter Sagal explains below, those shortcuts just don’t pan out. In the end there is no substitute for a little bit of money. So we’re asking you to donate a little bit now. And once we get what we need to carry on, we will stop asking. Pretty simple.

Make a gift to NCPR now!